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No relationship between prenatal androgen exposure and autistic traits: Convergent evidence from studies of children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and of amniotic testosterone concentrations in typically-developing children

Kung, Karson T.F., Spencer, Debra, Pasterski, Vickie, Neufeld, Sharon, Glover, Vivette, O'Connor, Thomas G., Hindmarsh, Peter C., Hughes, Ieuan A., Acerini, Carlo L., Hines, Melissa and others. (2016) No relationship between prenatal androgen exposure and autistic traits: Convergent evidence from studies of children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and of amniotic testosterone concentrations in typically-developing children. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 57 (12). pp. 1455-1462. ISSN 0021-9630. (doi:10.1111/jcpp.12602) (KAR id:79624)

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Abstract

Background: There is a marked male preponderance in autism spectrum conditions. The extreme male brain theory and the fetal androgen theory of autism suggest that elevated prenatal testosterone exposure is a key contributor to autistic traits. The current paper reports findings from two separate studies that test this hypothesis.

Results: Findings from neither study supported the association between prenatal androgen (testosterone) exposure and autistic traits. Specifically, young girls with and without CAH did not differ significantly in CAST scores and amniotic testosterone concentrations were not significantly associated with CAST scores in boys, girls, or the whole sample.

Conclusions: These studies do not support a relationship between prenatal testosterone exposure and autistic traits. These findings augment prior research suggesting no consistent relationship between early androgen exposure and autistic traits.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/jcpp.12602
Uncontrolled keywords: congenital adrenal hyperplasia; fetal testosterone; prenatal testosterone exposure; autism; austistic traits; extreme male brain
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Developmental Psychology
Depositing User: Karson Kung
Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2020 01:17 UTC
Last Modified: 07 Feb 2020 04:12 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/79624 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Kung, Karson T.F.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1598-1513
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