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We Are All in This Together: The Role of Individuals’ Social Identities in Problematic Engagement with Video Games and the Internet

Travaglino, Giovanni A., Li, Zhuo, Zhang, Xingruo, Lu, Xian, Choi, Hoon-Seok (2020) We Are All in This Together: The Role of Individuals’ Social Identities in Problematic Engagement with Video Games and the Internet. British Journal of Social Psychology, . ISSN 0144-6665. E-ISSN 2044-8309. (doi:10.1111/bjso.12365) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:79595)

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Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12365

Abstract

Individuals’ engagement with videogames and the internet features both social and potentially pathological aspects. In this research, we draw on the social identity approach and present a novel framework to understand the linkage between these two aspects. In three samples (Nstudy1 = 304, Nstudy2 = 160 and Nstudy3 = 782) of young Chinese people from two age groups (approximately 20 and 16 years old), we test the associations between relevant social identities and problematic engagement with videogames and the internet. Across studies, we demonstrate that individuals’ identification as ‘gamers’ or ‘frequent internet users’ predicts problematic engagement with videogames and the internet through stronger perceived social support from such groups. Moreover, we demonstrate that individuals’ identification as ‘students’ (Studies 2-3) is negatively associated with problematic engagement via social support from other students. Finally, in Study 3, we examine the articulation between social support from these three groups and subjective sense of loneliness. Findings indicate that, whereas perceived support from students is negatively associated with loneliness, the association between perceived support from gamers and internet users and loneliness is weaker and positive. Theoretical implications and directions for future research are discussed. Taken together, the studies highlight the importance of considering the social context of individuals’ problematic engagement with technologies, and the role of different group memberships.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/bjso.12365
Uncontrolled keywords: Problematic video game use; problematic internet use; social identity; social support; loneliness
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Centre for the Study of Group Processes
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Giovanni Travaglino
Date Deposited: 17 Jan 2020 01:35 UTC
Last Modified: 26 Mar 2020 14:56 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/79595 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Travaglino, Giovanni A.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4091-0634
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