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So Why Do We Love But Exploit Animals? Reflections and solutions

Hodson, Gordon and Dhont, Kristof (2019) So Why Do We Love But Exploit Animals? Reflections and solutions. In: Why We Love and Exploit Animals: Bridging Insights from Academia and Advocacy. Bridging Insights from Academia and Advocacy . Routledge, pp. 321-342. ISBN 978-0-8153-9665-9. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:79353)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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Abstract

Humans prioritize and value humans over animals in virtually every way, at considerable cost to both animals and humans. In addressing why people paradoxically love but exploit animals, the present book uniquely assembled some of the most prominent voices on human-animal relations to bridge insights between academia and advocacy. This chapter synthesizes their overall discussions around three broad themes. First, we consider the nature of the problem, including topics such as animal welfare, undervaluing animals, competition with animals, social (dis)identification with animals, cultural influences, ideology and politics, and the intersection of speciesism with anti-human prejudices (e.g., racism). Second, we explore how people live with the paradox, involving discussions of biases in human thinking in general (and with regard to animals in particular), complications inherent in the notion of “moral” thinking, and the human propensity to rationalize the status quo. Third, we reflect on solutions and remedies, including a focus on psychological constructs (e.g., perceived human-animal divide; empathy), plus calls to redirect future goals and actions, bolster humane education, leverage prosocial aspects of human psychology to benefit animals, and engage in evidence-based advocacy.

Item Type: Book section
Uncontrolled keywords: Centre for the Study of Group Processes
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Centre for the Study of Group Processes
Depositing User: Kristof Dhont
Date Deposited: 18 Dec 2019 16:53 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 04:20 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/79353 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Dhont, Kristof: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6060-8083
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