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Mutilation and Disfiguration

Anderson, Julie (2017) Mutilation and Disfiguration. In: 1914-1918-online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War. Freie Universitat Berlin. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:78934)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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Abstract

The First World War created disfigured and mutilated bodies on a grand scale. Never before had the bodies of soldiers been so devastated by a conflict. Developments in established weapons such as cannons and machine guns, and terrifying innovations such as poison gas, created a relative army of disfigured and mutilated men. Some men lost multiple limbs and sensory organs such as eyes. No part of the body was safe from the potential of severe and life-changing wounds. Owing to new and advanced medical specialities, surgical techniques, and technical innovations, soldiers survived wounds that in previous conflicts might have killed them. Wounds healed, but often bodies were left badly disfigured and mutilated. These men had to manage not only the result of their bodily wounds, but also their emotional trauma and their new role as disabled veterans. For these damaged men, their war was over, but recovery, rehabilitation, and reintegration presented a new set of challenges.

Item Type: Book section
Subjects: D History General and Old World > D History (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: Julie Anderson
Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2019 16:14 UTC
Last Modified: 22 Nov 2019 15:56 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/78934 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Anderson, Julie: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7131-3704
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