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The effect of composition and gastric conditions on the self-emulsification process of ibuprofen-loaded self-emulsifying drug delivery systems: A microscopic and dynamic gastric model study

Mercuri, A., Passalacqua, A., Wickham, M.S.J., Faulks, R.M., Craig, D.Q.M., Barker, S.A. (2011) The effect of composition and gastric conditions on the self-emulsification process of ibuprofen-loaded self-emulsifying drug delivery systems: A microscopic and dynamic gastric model study. Pharmaceutical Research, 28 (7). pp. 1540-1551. ISSN 0724-8741. (doi:10.1007/s11095-011-0387-8) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:78849)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided.
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11095-011-0387-8

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the physical processes involved in the emulsification of self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDSs) and the use of the Dynamic Gastric Model (DGM) as a characterisation tool. Methods: SEDDSs based on soybean oil, Tween 80, Span 80 and ibuprofen were prepared and their equilibrium phase diagrams established. The emulsification behaviour in a range of media was studied using polarised light microscopy and particle sizing. The behaviour of the SEDDSs in the DGM and conventional testing equipment was assessed. Results: A range of liquid crystalline mesophases was observed, enhanced in the presence of the drug. Polarised light microscopy showed different emulsification processes in the presence and absence of the drug, which was also manifest in different droplet sizes. The droplet size distribution varied between the DGM and the USP II dissolution apparatus. Conclusions: The model SEDDS displays complex liquid crystalline behaviour which may be intimately involved in the emulsification process, which in turn may alter particle size on emulsification, although there remains a question as to the in vivo significance of this effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the DGM represents a very promising new method of assessing the biological fate of SEDDSs.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/s11095-011-0387-8
Uncontrolled keywords: droplet size, dynamic gastric model, mechanism of self-emulsification, phase diagram, self-emulsifying systems, ibuprofen, polysorbate 80, sorbitan oleate, soybean oil, article, controlled study, digestion, drug delivery system, drug solubility, dynamics, emulsion, human, human experiment, intermethod comparison, mathematical model, microscopy, normal human, particle size, physical chemistry, priority journal, self emulsifying drug delivery system, stomach, validation process, Animals, Drug Delivery Systems, Emulsifying Agents, Gastric Acid, Gastric Mucosa, Ibuprofen, Models, Biological, Particle Size, Polysorbates, Solubility, Swine
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > Medway School of Pharmacy
Depositing User: Susan Barker
Date Deposited: 27 Nov 2019 10:27 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2021 10:26 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/78849 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Barker, S.A.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4880-0253
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