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Impact of a novel teaching method based on feedback, activity, individuality and relevance on students' learning

Edafe, O., Brooks, W.S., Laskar, S.N., Benjamin, M.W., Chan, P. (2016) Impact of a novel teaching method based on feedback, activity, individuality and relevance on students' learning. International Journal of Medical Education, 7 . pp. 87-92. ISSN 2042-6372. (doi:10.5116/ijme.56e3.e7ab) (KAR id:78320)

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Official URL:
http://dx.doi.org/10.5116/ijme.56e3.e7ab

Abstract

Objectives: This study examines the perceived impact of a novel clinical teaching method based on FAIR principles (feedback, activity, individuality and relevance) on students’ learning on clinical placement. Methods: This was a qualitative research study. Participants were third year and final year medical students attached to one UK vascular firm over a four-year period (N=108). Students were asked to write a reflective essay on how FAIRness approach differs from previous clinical placement, and its advantages and disadvantages. Essays were thematically analysed and globally rated (positive, negative or neutral) by two independent researchers. Results: Over 90% of essays reported positive experiences of feedback, activity, individuality and relevance model. The model provided multifaceted feedback; active participation; longitudinal improvement; relevance to stage of learning and future goals; structured teaching; professional development; safe learning environment; consultant involvement in teaching. Students perceived preparation for tutorials to be time intensive for tutors/students; a lack of teaching on medical sciences and direct observation of performance; more than once weekly sessions would be beneficial; some issues with peer and public feedback, relevance to upcoming exam and large group sizes. Students described negative experiences of “standard” clinical teaching. Conclusions: Progressive teaching programmes based on the FAIRness principles, feedback, activity, individuality and relevance, could be used as a model to improve current undergraduate clinical teaching.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.5116/ijme.56e3.e7ab
Uncontrolled keywords: clinical students, Clinical teaching, small group teaching, teaching model, transition period, education, feedback system, human, individuality, learning, medical education, medical student, procedures, teaching, United Kingdom, Education, Medical, Undergraduate, Educational Measurement, Feedback, Humans, Individuality, Learning, Students, Medical, Teaching, United Kingdom
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > Kent and Medway Medical School
Depositing User: Philip Chan
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2019 11:16 UTC
Last Modified: 25 Nov 2021 16:09 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/78320 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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