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Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly (BBF) Scotland infographic

Eida, Tamsyn J. and Kendall, Sally (2019) Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly (BBF) Scotland infographic. Other. Scottish Government (Unpublished) (KAR id:78275)

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Language: English
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Abstract

Breastfeeding rates in Scotland have improved in recent years, with an increase from 44% (2001/02) to 51% (2017/18) of babies reportedly receiving ‘any breastfeeding’ at first health visitor visit, and the proportion of babies being breastfed at 6-8 weeks rising from 36% of babies (born in 2001/02) to 42% (born in 2017/18). However, the figures remain relatively low and drop off rates high, with breastfeeding rates lower among women in areas of higher deprivation, exacerbating health inequalities. Supported by the University of Kent and facilitated by Scottish Government, a Scottish Committee of experts has worked since May 2018 to carry out the 5 step meeting process: a) To measure the current breastfeeding environment b) To develop a plan to implement recommendations to guide the scaling up of national breastfeeding protection, promotion and support efforts. This infographic presents the findings of the assessment of the Breastfeeding environment in Scotland and the committee's eight evidence-informed recommendation themes, based on the BBF Gear model.

Item Type: Monograph (Other)
Uncontrolled keywords: breastfeeding environment; Scotland; health inequalities; scale up framework; protect, promote and suport
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tamsyn Eida
Date Deposited: 05 Nov 2019 16:12 UTC
Last Modified: 09 Apr 2020 03:11 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/78275 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Kendall, Sally: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2507-0350
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