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Smoking prevalence and the changing risk profiles in the UK ethnic and migrant minority populations: implications for stop smoking services

Aspinall, P. J., Mitton, L. (2014) Smoking prevalence and the changing risk profiles in the UK ethnic and migrant minority populations: implications for stop smoking services. Public Health, 128 (3). pp. 297-306. ISSN 0033-3506. E-ISSN 1476-5616. (doi:10.1016/j.puhe.2013.12.013) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2013.12.013

Abstract

Objectives

Observational study using cross-sectional surveys.

Methods

Smoking prevalence is substantially higher amongst migrants from East European countries (that for males exceeding 50% from three such countries and for females over 33% from four countries) and from Turkey and Greece, compared with most other non-UK born groups, and amongst ethnic groups is elevated in the ‘mixed’ groups. Rates are highest in the Gypsy or Irish Traveller group, 49% (of 162) and 46% (of 155) for males and females respectively. Across ethnic groups, rates are almost always higher in the UK born than non-UK born population with the notable exception of the ‘White Other’ group, with Prevalence Ratios (PRs) indicating a larger migrant-non-migrant differential amongst females (e.g. Indians 2.95 (2.33–3.73); Black Caribbeans 3.28 (2.73–3.94). Age-adjusted rates show the persistence of these differentials in females across age groups, though young males (18–29) in seven minority ethnic groups show lower rates in the UK-born groups. The ‘White’ and ‘Chinese’ groups show a strong socio-economic gradient in smoking which is absent in the South Asian groups and diminished in the ‘mixed’ and black groups.

Conclusions

Given the evidence that smoking behaviour is significantly different in some of the new groups, notably East European migrants, stop smoking services are failing to optimize the acceptability and, consequently, favourable outcomes for these programmes. These services need to be adapted to the particular patterns of smoking behaviour and language skills within different communities of descent.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.puhe.2013.12.013
Uncontrolled keywords: Smoking, Prevalence, Ethnic minority groups, Migrants
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Lavinia Mitton
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2019 15:48 UTC
Last Modified: 04 Nov 2019 09:26 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/78156 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Mitton, L.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7994-6135
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