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The Americas in the Trans-Pacific Partnership

Biegon, Rubrick (2019) The Americas in the Trans-Pacific Partnership. In: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics. Oxford University Press. (doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.013.1514) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:78077)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.0...

Abstract

Following the end of the Cold War, the hegemony of the United States in Latin America was intimately related to the globalization of the hemispheric political economy. Free-trade agreements (FTAs) were crucial to this process, helping to extend and entrench the neoliberal model. As a result of the region’s political turn to the left during the 2000s, however, the Washington Consensus became increasingly untenable. As U.S. trade policy subsequently moved in the direction of a “post-Washington Consensus,” the “Pink Tide” fostered the creation of Latin American-led approaches to integration independent of the United States. In this context, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) was designed to catalyse a new wave of (neo)liberalization among its 12 participating countries, including the United States, Canada, Chile, Peru, and Mexico.

The TPP codified an updated and comprehensive set of rules on an array of trade and investment disciplines not covered in existing agreements. Strategically linking the Asia-Pacific to the Americas, but excluding China, the TPP responded to China’s growing economic presence in Asia and Latin America. Largely a creation of U.S. foreign economic policy, the United States withdrew from the TPP prior to its ratification and following the election of Donald Trump as U.S. president. The remaining 11 countries signed a more limited version of the agreement, known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), which is open to future participation by the United States and other countries in Asia and Latin America. The uncertainties in the TPP process represented the further erosion of Washington’s “free trade” consensus, reflecting, among other things, a crisis of U.S. hegemony in the Americas

Item Type: Book section
DOI/Identification number: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.013.1514
Uncontrolled keywords: Trans-Pacific Partnership, trade, post–Washington Consensus, hegemony, China, Obama administration, Trump administration, neoliberalism, Gramsci, Latin American politics
Subjects: J Political Science
J Political Science > JZ International relations
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Depositing User: Rubrick Biegon
Date Deposited: 30 Oct 2019 09:45 UTC
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2019 09:47 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/78077 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Biegon, Rubrick: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4337-809X
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