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Sex Differences, Seasonality, and Macronutrient Balancing in the Diet of Chimpanzees Inhabiting a Forest-Agricultural Mosaic

Bryson-Morrison, Nicola, Beer, Andy, Matsuzawa, Tetsuro, Humle, Tatyana (2017) Sex Differences, Seasonality, and Macronutrient Balancing in the Diet of Chimpanzees Inhabiting a Forest-Agricultural Mosaic. In: Folia Primatologica. 7th European Federation for Primatology Meeting. . Karger (doi:10.1159/000479094) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

Many primates face spatial and temporal fluctuations in food availability, which can significantly affect their ability to meet nutritional requirements. Anthropogenic disturbances and influences, such as agriculture, human presence and infrastructures, can further impact seasonal food availability, dietary composition and nutrition. Primates residing in anthropogenic landscapes often incorporate cultivars into their diets. However, the nutritional drivers behind cultivar consumption are poorly understood. We examined variations in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) macronutrient intake from wild and cultivated foods between sexes and seasons over a 1year period in Bossou, Guinea. We used the geometric framework of nutrition to examine proportional contributions of macronutrients to the diet and nutrient balancing. We conducted

able to maintain a consistent balance of protein to non-protein (carbohydrates, lipids, and NDF) energy across the year. Our results suggest that Bossou chimpanzees suffered little seasonal constraints in food quality or availability since they were able to combine their consumption of available wild and cultivated foods to achieve a balanced diet. These findings contribute significantly to our understanding of primate nutritional requirements and their ability to meet these in disturbed environments.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Proceeding)
DOI/Identification number: 10.1159/000479094
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Biological Anthropology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Tatyana Humle
Date Deposited: 22 Oct 2019 09:30 UTC
Last Modified: 24 Oct 2019 12:56 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/77696 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Humle, Tatyana: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1919-631X
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