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The interface between wild chimpanzee culture, land use management and agricultural development: the case of the oil palm

Humle, Tatyana, Garriga, Rosa M., McKenna, A,, Amarasekaran, Bala (2014) The interface between wild chimpanzee culture, land use management and agricultural development: the case of the oil palm. In: International Primatological Society, 25th Congress, August 11-16, 2014, Hanoi, Vietnam. (Unpublished) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a common and sometimes predominant feature of many West African landscapes. In countries such as Guinea and Sierra Leone, wild or feral oil palms often dominate fallow and cultivated fields, as well as abandoned or recent human settlements; they also thrive in gallery and secondary forests. We will highlight here the extent to which wild chimpanzees differ in their cultural use and dependence on the oil palm. Across Africa, many wild chimpanzee communities make use of oil palm parts for feeding and nesting purposes. People also traditionally depend on the oil palm for a range of purposes including among others cooking, soap and wine making and construction for both subsistence and commercial purposes. Increasing global demand for oil palm is rapidly changing the landscape to include both large and small scale plantations. We used data gathered as part of a nationwide survey of chimpanzees as well as from more focused studies in areas reporting high levels of human-wildlife interactions to assess 1) the extent of competition in the use of oil palm between people, chimpanzees and other wildlife and 2) relative perceptions concerning competition for the oil palm between chimpanzees and people. We discuss the implication of these patterns with respect to land use management and agricultural development in West Africa.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Proceeding)
Uncontrolled keywords: great ape, oil palm, conservation, animal culture
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Tatyana Humle
Date Deposited: 22 Oct 2019 09:13 UTC
Last Modified: 24 Oct 2019 14:51 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/77686 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Humle, Tatyana: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1919-631X
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