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Stasis and Change: Russia and the Emergence of an Anti-Hegemonic World Order

Sakwa, Richard (2019) Stasis and Change: Russia and the Emergence of an Anti-Hegemonic World Order. In: Dal, Emel Parlar and Ersen, Emre, eds. Russia in the Changing International System. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, Switzerland, pp. 17-38. ISBN 978-3-030-21831-7. E-ISBN 978-3-030-21832-4. (doi:10.1007/978-3-030-21832-4_2) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-21832-4_2

Abstract

This chapter argues that after a quarter century of stasis, the pattern of world order is changing and the inter-cold war period of the cold peace is giving way not to a thaw, but to the re-entrenchment of bipolar confrontation between the expansive liberal international order and the resistance of a group of states including Russia. Like the First Cold War, the second is also about the conflicting views of world order as the U.S.-led liberal international order is challenged by the emergence of a putative anti-hegemonic alignment between Russia, China and their allies in the emerging alternative architecture of world affairs – especially the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) and BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa). The clash between Russia and the West, in this sense, is only an early version – and ultimately perhaps not the most significant – of the challenges against the long-term stasis in international affairs. Although the sinews of a post-Western world are emerging, it remains to be seen whether bodies like SCO and BRICS will be able to sustain the multilateralism of the last seven decades in the absence of the hegemon that had provided the security and support for such multilaterialism to thrive.

Item Type: Book section
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/978-3-030-21832-4_2
Uncontrolled keywords: Stasis, Russia, Cold War, cold peace, Russia West relations, anti-hegemonic world order, neo-revisionism
Subjects: J Political Science > JZ International relations
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Depositing User: Richard Sakwa
Date Deposited: 07 Oct 2019 07:29 UTC
Last Modified: 09 Oct 2019 09:09 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/77087 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Sakwa, Richard: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6678-8820
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