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Ingroup identity as an obstacle to effective multiprofessional and interprofessional teamwork: findings from an ethnographic study of healthcare assistants in dementia care

V. Lloyd, Joanne, Schneider, Justine, Scales, Kezia, Bailey, Simon, Jones, Rob (2011) Ingroup identity as an obstacle to effective multiprofessional and interprofessional teamwork: findings from an ethnographic study of healthcare assistants in dementia care. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 25 (5). pp. 345-351. ISSN 1356-1820. (doi:10.3109/13561820.2011.567381) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:76203)

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https://doi.org/10.3109/13561820.2011.567381

Abstract

Rising dementia incidence is likely to increase pressures on healthcare services, making effective well coordinated care imperative. Yet, barriers to this care approach exist which, we argue, might be understood by focussing on identity dynamics at the frontlines of care. In this article, we draw upon findings from an ethnographic study of healthcare assistants (HCAs) from three dementia wards across one National Health Service mental health trust. Data revealed that the HCAs are a close-knit ‘in-group’ who share low group status and norms and, often highlight their own expertise in order to promote self worth. HCAs’ social identity is considered as a barrier to effective teamwork with strong ingroup behaviour suggested as a consequence of their marginalisation. We explore these findings with reference to social identity theory (Tajfel, ; Turner, ) and discuss implications for delivering multiprofessional and interprofessional care.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.3109/13561820.2011.567381
Uncontrolled keywords: Multiprofessional, interprofessional, teamwork, social identity, healthcare assistants, ethnography, inpatient dementia care
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Simon Bailey
Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2019 11:00 UTC
Last Modified: 26 Sep 2019 09:24 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/76203 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Bailey, Simon: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9142-2791
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