Skip to main content

Adolescent perspectives about their participation in alcohol intervention research in emergency care: A qualitative exploration using ethical principles as an analytical framework

Rodda, Simone, Lynch, Ellen, McGovern, Ruth, Elzerbi, Catherine, Breckons, Matthew, Deluca, Paolo, Drummond, Colin, Alam, Mohammed Fasihul, Boniface, Sadie, Coulton, Simon, and others. (2019) Adolescent perspectives about their participation in alcohol intervention research in emergency care: A qualitative exploration using ethical principles as an analytical framework. PLoS ONE, 14 (6). ISSN 1932-6203. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0217855) (KAR id:74574)

PDF Publisher pdf
Language: English


Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Download (473kB) Preview
[img]
Preview
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0217855

Abstract

Aims: To explore adolescents’ experiences of consenting to, and participating in, alcohol intervention trials when attending for emergency care.

Methods: In-depth semi-structured interviews with 27 adolescents (16 males; aged 14–17 years (Mage = 15.7)) who had taken part in one of two linked brief alcohol intervention trials based in 10 accident and emergency departments in England. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and subject to thematic analysis

Results: Research and intervention methods were generally found to be acceptable though confidentiality was important and parental presence could hinder truthful disclosures regarding alcohol use. Participants discussed the importance of being involved in research that was relevant to them and recognised alcohol consumption as a normative part of adolescence, highlighting the importance of having access to appropriate health information. Beyond this, they recognised the benefits and risks of trial participation for themselves and others with the majority showing a degree of altruism in considering longer term implications for others as well as themselves.

Conclusions: Alcohol screening and intervention in emergency care is both acceptable and relevant to adolescents but acceptability is reliant on confidentiality being assured and may be inhibited by parental presence.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1371/journal.pone.0217855
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Simon Coulton
Date Deposited: 25 Jun 2019 11:13 UTC
Last Modified: 08 Jul 2019 09:16 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/74574 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Coulton, Simon: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7704-3274
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year