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Ochre, ground stone and wrapping the dead in the Late Epipalaeolithic (Natufian) Levant: revealing the funerary practices at Shubayqa 1, Jordan

Richter, Tobias, Bocaege, Emmy, Ilsøe, Peter, Ruter, Anthony, Pantos, Alexis, Pedersen, Patrick, Yeomans, Lisa (2019) Ochre, ground stone and wrapping the dead in the Late Epipalaeolithic (Natufian) Levant: revealing the funerary practices at Shubayqa 1, Jordan. Journal of Field Archaeology, 44 (7). pp. 440-457. ISSN 0093-4690. (doi:10.1080/00934690.2019.1645546) (KAR id:73785)

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Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1080/00934690.2019.1645546

Abstract

The appearance of rich and diverse funerary practices is one of the hallmarks of the Late Epipalaeolithic Natufian in the Levant. Numerous burials at a number of sites excavated mostly in the Mediterranean zone of the southern Levant have fed into the interpretation of the Natufian as a sedentary society of complex hunter-gatherers. Here, we report on the human remains recovered from Shubayqa 1, a well-dated early to late Natufian site in northeast Jordan. The majority of the minimum of 23 individuals that are represented are perinates and infants, which represents an atypical population profile. Ground stone artifacts and traces of colourants are associated with some of these individuals, providing a rare insight into funerary treatment of subadults in Natufian contexts. We interpret the Shubayqa 1 evidence in the light of current and ongoing debates concerning Natufian burial practices and the issue of social complexity.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/00934690.2019.1645546
Uncontrolled keywords: Natufian, Epipalaeolithic, mortuary practices, ochre, wrapping, fragmentation, Jordan, southwest Asia
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Depositing User: Emmy Bocaege
Date Deposited: 07 May 2019 14:35 UTC
Last Modified: 28 Aug 2021 23:00 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/73785 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Bocaege, Emmy: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9988-3530
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