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Network analysis of a stakeholder community combatting illegal wildlife trade

Moshier, Andrea, Steadman, Janna, Roberts, David L. (2019) Network analysis of a stakeholder community combatting illegal wildlife trade. Conservation Biology, . pp. 1-28. E-ISSN 1523-1739. (doi:10.1111/cobi.13336) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

The illegal wildlife trade has emerged as a growing and urgent environmental issue. Stakeholders involved in the efforts to curb wildlife trafficking include non- governmental organizations (NGOs), academia, and state government/enforcement bodies. The extent to which these stakeholders work and communicate amongst each other is fundamental to effectively combatting illicit trade. Using the United Kingdom as a case study, we conducted a mixed methods study using a social network analysis and stakeholder interviews to assess communication relationships in the counter wildlife trafficking community. NGOs consistently occupied 4 of the 5 most central positions in the generated networks, while academic institutions were routinely the converse, filling 4 of the 5 most peripheral positions. However, NGOs were also shown to be the least diverse in their communication practices, compared to the other stakeholder groups. Through semi- structured interviews, personal relationships were identified as the biggest key to functioning communication. Participant insights also showed that stakeholder-specific variables (e.g. ethical/confidentiality concerns), and competition and fundraising, can have a confounding effect on inter-communication. Evaluating communication networks and intra- stakeholder communication trends is essential to facilitate a more cohesive, productive, and efficient response to the challenges of combatting illegal wildlife trade.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/cobi.13336
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Biodiversity Conservation Group
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Biodiversity Management Group
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: David Roberts
Date Deposited: 30 Apr 2019 12:03 UTC
Last Modified: 03 Jun 2019 09:45 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/73696 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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