Technological Revolution, Sustainability and Development in Africa: Overview, Emerging Issues and Challenges

Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph (2019) Technological Revolution, Sustainability and Development in Africa: Overview, Emerging Issues and Challenges. Sustainable Development, . ISSN 0968-0802. (doi:10.1002/sd.1950) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

The paper examines the silent technological revolution in sub‐Saharan Africa focusing on emerging issues and challenges. In view of the centrality of technology diffusion in fostering local innovations and economic development in developing countries, it is surprising that our understanding of the challenges and opportunities in scaling‐up technologies remains limited. This paper capitalises on the ongoing silent technological revolution in sub‐Saharan Africa to present an overview of how new technologies have been adopted and utilised to achieve sustainability. The study identified a host of factors such as weak regulatory enforcement systems, lack of financial credit availability, and limited banking services, which have created conditions for technological innovations such as mobile phone‐based banking, mPedigree, “cardiopad,” and M‐PEPEA to emerge. The public policy implications and directions for future research are identified and examined.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/sd.1950
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > International Business and Strategy
Depositing User: Joseph Amankwah-Amoah
Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2019 09:34 UTC
Last Modified: 15 Jul 2019 10:31 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/72902 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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