Exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories promotes prejudice which spreads across groups

Jolley, Daniel, Meleady, Rose, Douglas, Karen (2019) Exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories promotes prejudice which spreads across groups. British Journal of Psychology, . ISSN 0007-1269. (doi:10.1111/bjop.12385)

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Abstract

This research experimentally examined the effects of exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories on prejudice and discrimination. Study 1 (N = 166) demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories concerning immigrants to Britain from the European Union (vs. anti-conspiracy material or a control) exacerbated prejudice towards this group. Study 2 (N = 173) found the same effect in a different intergroup context—exposure to conspiracy theories about Jewish people (vs. anti-conspiracy material or a control) increased prejudice towards this group and reduced participants’ willingness to vote for a Jewish political candidate. Finally, Study 3 (N = 114) demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories about Jewish people not only increased prejudice towards this group but was indirectly associated with increased prejudice towards a number of secondary outgroups (e.g., Asians, Arabs, Americans, Irish, Australians). The current research suggests that conspiracy theories may have potentially damaging and widespread consequences for intergroup relations.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/bjop.12385
Uncontrolled keywords: conspiracy theories, discrimination, intergroup relations, prejudice
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Karen Douglas
Date Deposited: 14 Feb 2019 11:37 UTC
Last Modified: 03 Jun 2019 09:24 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/72488 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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