Skip to main content

Virgo to Virago: Medea in the Silver Age

Corrigan, Kirsty (2013) Virgo to Virago: Medea in the Silver Age. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, 300 pp. ISBN 978-1-4438-4655-4. E-ISBN 978-1-4438-5109-1. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
https://www.cambridgescholars.com/virgo-to-virago-...

Abstract

The infamous and formidable mythological figure of Medea has deservedly held an enduring appeal throughout the ages. This has perhaps never been more true than in the Silver Age of Latin literature, when the taste for rhetorical excess and the macabre made the heroine, and especially her notorious acts of witchcraft and the slaughter of her own children in revenge for her husband’s infidelity, a particularly suitable and attractive topic for literary treatment.

By examining the portrayal of this remarkable figure in the works of Ovid, Seneca and Valerius Flaccus, Virgo to Virago: Medea in the Silver Age offers a comprehensive study of the representation of the heroine, not only in this specific period, but in the entire Roman era, since these three authors provide the only substantial accounts of this figure to have survived in Classical Latin.

Through close analysis of the texts, Virgo to Virago explores the characterisation of Medea, whose mythical life was inevitably overshadowed by her legendary behaviour, considering whether these accounts merely accord with the particular traits of the Silver Age, or whether this mighty female character has any claim to sympathy or admiration in these texts.

The book simultaneously examines how the Latin authors compare with, and differ from, both one another and their extant Greek and Roman predecessors, concluding with a discussion of the significance of any comparisons to be drawn between these portrayals of the Roman Medea.

Item Type: Book
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PA Classical philology
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages
Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages > Classical and Archaeological Studies
Depositing User: Kirsty Corrigan
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2019 11:30 UTC
Last Modified: 01 Aug 2019 10:44 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/72200 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Corrigan, Kirsty: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5473-4152
  • Depositors only (login required):