Skip to main content

Recent Trends Concerning Upconversion Nanoparticles and Near-IR Emissive Lanthanide Materials in the Context of Forensic Applications.

Gee, William J. (2019) Recent Trends Concerning Upconversion Nanoparticles and Near-IR Emissive Lanthanide Materials in the Context of Forensic Applications. Australian Journal of Chemistry, 72 (3). pp. 164-173. ISSN 0004-9425. E-ISSN 1445-0038. (doi:10.1071/CH18502)

PDF - Publisher pdf

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Download (440kB) Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF - Author's Accepted Manuscript
Download (1MB) Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF - Pre-print
Restricted to Repository staff only
Contact us about this Publication Download (1MB)
[img]
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/CH18502

Abstract

Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are materials that, upon absorbing multiple photons of low energy (e.g. infrared radiation), subsequently emit a single photon of higher energy, typically within the visible spectrum. The physics of these materials have been the subject of detailed investigations driven by the potential application of these materials as medical imaging devices. One largely overlooked application of UCNPs is forensic science, wherein the ability to produce visible 5 light from infrared light sources would result in a new generation of fingerprint powders that circumvent background interference which can be encountered with visible and ultraviolet light sources. Using lower energy, infrared radiation would simultaneously improve the safety of forensic practitioners who often employ light sources in less than ideal locations. This review article covers the development of UCNPs, the use of infrared radiation to visualise fingerprints by the forensic sciences, and the potential benefits of applying UCNP materials over current approaches.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1071/CH18502
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences
Depositing User: William Gee
Date Deposited: 02 Jan 2019 09:36 UTC
Last Modified: 30 May 2019 08:41 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/71480 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Gee, William J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6520-6216
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year