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Examining teachers' ratings of feedback following success and failure: A study of Chinese English teachers

Skipper, Yvonne, Douglas, Karen (2019) Examining teachers' ratings of feedback following success and failure: A study of Chinese English teachers. British Journal of Educational Psychology, . ISSN 0007-0998. (doi:10.1111/bjep.12261) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

Background: Previous research has explored the impact of different types of praise and criticism on how children experience success and failure. However, less is known about how teachers choose to deliver feedback and specifically whether they deliver person (ability) or process (effort) feedback. Aim: The aim of the current study was to use vignettes to explore how teachers would deliver feedback following success and failure. Sample: The sample consisted of Chinese Primary school English teachers (N=169). Method: Participants read vignettes depicting children’s educational successes and failures. They rated their perceptions of task difficulty, likelihood of giving feedback, and likelihood of giving both person and process forms of feedback. They also completed measures of whether they viewed intelligence as fixed or malleable. Results: Results suggested that teachers stated that they would be more likely to give praise than criticism and would be more likely to give feedback for tasks perceived to be more challenging than easy. Following success, teachers endorsed the use of person and process feedback interchangeably, while following failure they endorsed more process feedback. Finally, teachers’ understanding of intelligence was also associated with feedback delivery. If teachers believed that intelligence was fixed (vs. something that can be developed), they said that they were more likely to give more person and process praise, but following failure gave more process feedback. Conclusion: The current research gives insight into how teachers give feedback, and how perceived task difficulty and teachers’ views of intelligence can influence these choices. Further research is needed to understand why teachers may make these decisions.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/bjep.12261
Uncontrolled keywords: feedback, theory of intelligence, praise, criticism, teacher
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Karen Douglas
Date Deposited: 04 Dec 2018 12:46 UTC
Last Modified: 05 Jun 2019 15:00 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/70608 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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