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Adolescents' Perceptions of Their Peers with Tourette's Syndrome: Does A Brief Anti-Stigma Intervention Help?

Malli, Melina Aikaterini (2018) Adolescents' Perceptions of Their Peers with Tourette's Syndrome: Does A Brief Anti-Stigma Intervention Help? Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) thesis, University of Kent,.

Abstract

Background and aim: Tourette's syndrome is a neurodevelopmental condition characterised by tics. It is a condition that has been stigmatised by the public. School age children and especially adolescents often experience rejection from their typically developing peers due to their symptomology which could hinder school inclusion and social participation. Therefore, there is a need for implementing interventions to target typically developing peers' inaccurate knowledge about TS, and their negative attitudes. There is also a paucity of studies that explore the motivation of peers who stigmatise against people with TS. Understanding stigma and its underlying causes, however, is vital to develop effective interventions that can minimise and help to eventually eradicate stigma.

Conclusion: Tailor-made interventions can contribute substantially to preventing consolidation of unfavourable attitudes towards individuals with TS. Future research should however place emphasis on how these positive outcomes could be maintained over time. Implications of these findings for school curricula and mental health policy, as well as suggestions for future research, are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctor of Philosophy (PhD))
Thesis advisor: Forrester-Jones, Rachel
Thesis advisor: McCarthy, Michelle
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
SWORD Depositor: System Moodle
Depositing User: System Moodle
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2018 13:12 UTC
Last Modified: 23 Jan 2020 04:15 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/69880 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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