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Rising aspirations dampen satisfaction

Clark, Andrew E., Kamesaka, A., Tamura, T. (2015) Rising aspirations dampen satisfaction. Education Economics, 23 (5). pp. 515-531. ISSN 0964-5292. (doi:10.1080/09645292.2015.1042960) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09645292.2015.1042960

Abstract

It is commonly believed that education is a good thing for individuals. Yet, its correlation with subjective well-being is most often only weakly positive, or even negative, despite the many associated better individual-level outcomes. We here square the circle using novel Japanese data on happiness aspirations. If reported happiness comes from a comparison of outcomes to aspirations, then any phenomenon raising both at the same time will have only a muted effect on reported well-being. We find that around half of the happiness effect of education is cancelled out by higher aspirations, and suggest a similar dampening effect for income.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/09645292.2015.1042960
Uncontrolled keywords: education; income; psychology
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School
Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Industrial Relations/HRM
Depositing User: Andrew Clark
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2018 11:12 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 21:10 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/69181 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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