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Economic Growth Evens Out Happiness: Evidence from Six Surveys

Clark, Andrew E., Flèche, S., Senik, C. (2016) Economic Growth Evens Out Happiness: Evidence from Six Surveys. Review of Income and Wealth, 62 (3). pp. 405-419. ISSN 0034-6586. (doi:10.1111/roiw.12190) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/roiw.12190

Abstract

In spite of the great U-turn that saw income inequality rise in Western countries in the 1980s, happiness inequality has fallen in countries that have experienced income growth (but not in those that did not). Modern growth has reduced the share of both the “very unhappy” and the “perfectly happy.” Lower happiness inequality is found both between and within countries, and between and within individuals. Our cross-country regression results suggest that the extension of various public goods helps to explain this greater happiness homogeneity. This new stylized fact arguably comes as a bonus to the Easterlin paradox, offering a somewhat brighter perspective for developing countries.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/roiw.12190
Uncontrolled keywords: development, Easterlin paradox, economic growth, happiness, inequality
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School
Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Industrial Relations/HRM
Depositing User: Andrew Clark
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2018 10:34 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 21:10 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/69177 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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