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Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study

Clark, Andrew E., Lee, Tom (2017) Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, . ISSN 0167-2681. (doi:10.1016/j.jebo.2017.11.013) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2017.11.013

Abstract

We here use data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) to provide one of the first analyses of the distal (early-life) and proximal (later-life) correlates of older-life subjective well-being. Unusually, we have two distinct measures of the latter: happiness and eudaimonia. Even after controlling for proximal covariates, outcomes at age 18 (IQ score, parental income and parental education) remain good predictors of well-being over 50 years later. In terms of the proximal covariates, mental health and social participation are the strongest predictors of both measures of well-being in older age. However, there are notable differences in the other correlates of happiness and eudaimonia. As such, well-being policy will depend to an extent on which measure is preferred.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.jebo.2017.11.013
Uncontrolled keywords: Life-course; Well-being; Eudaimonia; Health; Happiness
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Industrial Relations/HRM
Depositing User: Andrew Clark
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2018 09:37 UTC
Last Modified: 15 Jul 2019 08:06 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/69174 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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