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Migrants’ motivations to work in the care sector: experiences from England within the context of EU enlargement

Hussein, Shereen, Stevens, Martin, Manthorpe, Jill (2013) Migrants’ motivations to work in the care sector: experiences from England within the context of EU enlargement. European Journal of Ageing, 10 (2). pp. 101-109. ISSN 1613-9372. (doi:10.1007/s10433-012-0254-4) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:68335)

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https://doi.org/10.1007/s10433-012-0254-4

Abstract

Migrant workers are considered an economic utility, especially for secondary labour markets such as that of long-term care. The dynamics of migrant workers across the globe are governed by interacting macro, state level, and micro, personal level, factors. On the macro level immigration policies, historical and current political and economic links between countries play a crucial part in such dynamics. On an individual level, choices, actions and motivations to migrate and work in certain labour sectors are entangled with and governed by macro level policies. Since 2003, the enlargement of the European Economic Area (EEA) has enabled employers in the UK to freely recruit staff from EEA countries. This article investigates reported individual motivations and the decision making process while accounting for macro factors, specifically ease of labour mobility within the EEA versus a more elaborate process when migrating to work in social care in the UK from outside the EEA. Face to face interviews were conducted with 96 migrant social care and social work staff in six diverse areas of England (2007-2009). The analysis indicates differences in stated motivations to migrate to the UK and to work in the care sector among different groups of migrants, particularly among those from Commonwealth countries, from the EEA, and migrants from other parts of the globe. The findings highlight the importance of taking into account the role of immigration policies and consequently immigration status when investigating the policy framework and delivery of care services for older people.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/s10433-012-0254-4
Additional information: Unmapped bibliographic data: M3 - Article [Field not mapped to EPrints] U2 - 10.1007/s10433-012-0254-4 [Field not mapped to EPrints] JO - European Journal of Ageing [Field not mapped to EPrints]
Uncontrolled keywords: Migration, Aged care, Long-term care, Workforce, European Union, Labour mobility, Motivations
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research
Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research > Personal Social Services Research Unit
Depositing User: Shereen Hussein
Date Deposited: 13 Nov 2018 11:49 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 13:56 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/68335 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Hussein, Shereen: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7946-0717
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