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The perfect storm: The privacy paradox and the Internet-of-Things

Williams, Meredydd, Nurse, Jason R. C., Creese, Sadie (2016) The perfect storm: The privacy paradox and the Internet-of-Things. In: 11th International Conference on Availability‚ Reliability and Security (ARES 2016), 31 Aug.-2 Sept. 2016, Salzburg, Austria. (doi:10.1109/ARES.2016.25)

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Abstract

Privacy is a concept found throughout human history and opinion polls suggest that the public value this principle. However, while many individuals claim to care about privacy, they are often perceived to express behaviour to the contrary. This phenomenon is known as the Privacy Paradox and its existence has been validated through numerous psychological, economic and computer science studies. Several contributory factors have been suggested including user interface design, risk saliency, social norms and default configurations. We posit that the further proliferation of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) will aggravate many of these factors, posing even greater risks to individuals’ privacy. This paper explores the evolution of both the paradox and the IoT, discusses how privacy risk might alter over the coming years, and suggests further research required to address a reasonable balance. We believe both technological and socio-technical measures are necessary to ensure privacy is protected in a world of ubiquitous data collection.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
DOI/Identification number: 10.1109/ARES.2016.25
Subjects: Q Science
T Technology
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Computing
Faculties > Sciences > School of Computing > Security Group
Depositing User: Jason Nurse
Date Deposited: 03 Jul 2018 14:19 UTC
Last Modified: 01 Aug 2019 10:43 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/67485 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Nurse, Jason R. C.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4118-1680
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