Reducing challenging behaviour of adults with intellectual disabilities in supported accommodation: A cluster randomized controlled trial of setting-wide positive behaviour support

McGill, Peter, Vanono, Leah, Clover, Will, Smyth, Emmett, Cooper, Vivien, Hopkins, Lisa, Barratt, Nick, Joyce, Christopher J., Henderson, Kate, Sekasi, Sheila, and others. (2018) Reducing challenging behaviour of adults with intellectual disabilities in supported accommodation: A cluster randomized controlled trial of setting-wide positive behaviour support. Research in Developmental Disabilities, . ISSN 0891-4222. (doi:10.1016/j.ridd.2018.04.020)

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https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2018.04.020

Abstract

Background Improving the quality of social care through the implementation of setting-wide positive behaviour support (SWPBS) may reduce and prevent challenging behaviour. Method Twenty-four supported accommodation settings were randomized to experimental or control conditions. Settings in both groups had access to individualized PBS either via the organisation’s Behaviour Support Team or from external professionals. Additionally, within the experimental group, social care practice was reviewed and improvement programmes set going. Progress was supported through coaching managers and staff to enhance their performance and draw more effectively on existing resources, and through monthly monitoring over 8–11 months. Quality of support, quality of life and challenging behaviour were measured at baseline and after intervention with challenging behaviour being additionally measured at long-term follow-up 12–18 months later. Results Following intervention there were significant changes to social care practice and quality of support in the experimental group. Ratings of challenging behaviour declined significantly more in the experimental group and the difference between groups was maintained at follow-up. There was no significant difference between the groups in measurement of quality of life. Staff, family members and professionals evaluated the intervention and its outcomes positively. Conclusions Some challenging behaviour in social care settings may be prevented by SWPBS that improves the quality of support provided to individuals.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.ridd.2018.04.020
Uncontrolled keywords: Intellectual disability, Adults, Challenging behaviour, Positive behaviour support, Randomized controlled trial, Supported accommodation
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Tizard
Depositing User: Peter McGill
Date Deposited: 17 May 2018 09:00 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 20:33 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/67062 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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