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Citizens and Condemnation: Strategic Uses of International Human Rights Pressure in Authoritarian States

Gruffydd-Jones, Jamie (2019) Citizens and Condemnation: Strategic Uses of International Human Rights Pressure in Authoritarian States. Comparative Political Studies, 52 (4). pp. 579-612. ISSN 0010-4140. E-ISSN 1552-3829. (doi:10.1177/0010414018784066)

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Abstract

Governments with strict control over the information that their citizens hear from foreign sources are regular targets of human rights pressure, but we know little about how this information matters in the domestic realm. I argue that authoritarian regimes strategically pass on certain types of external pressure to their public in order to ‘geopoliticise’ human rights violations, making citizens view human rights in terms of defending their nation internationally rather than in terms of individual violations, and more likely to be satisfied with their government’s behaviour. I find strong support for this model through statistical analysis of Chinese state media reports of external human rights pressure and a survey experiment on Chinese citizens’ responses to pressure on women’s rights. This analysis demonstrates that authoritarian regimes may be able to manipulate international human rights diplomacy to help them retain the support of their population while suppressing their human rights.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1177/0010414018784066
Uncontrolled keywords: China, human rights, intergovernmental relation
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Depositing User: Jamie Gruffydd-Jones
Date Deposited: 15 May 2018 09:36 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 20:33 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/67025 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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