Conserving predators across agricultural landscapes in Colombia: habitat use and space partitioning by jaguars, pumas, ocelots, and jaguarundis

Boron, Valeria and Xofis, Panteleimon and Link, Andres and Payan, Esteban and Tzanopoulos, Joseph (2018) Conserving predators across agricultural landscapes in Colombia: habitat use and space partitioning by jaguars, pumas, ocelots, and jaguarundis. Oryx, . ISSN 0030-6053. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1017/S0030605318000327) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1017/S0030605318000327

Abstract

Habitat loss and degradation continue to increase across the tropics. Consequently there is an urgent need to understand their effects, as well as species’ habitat requirements and distribution within human-modified landscapes, in order to reconcile agricultural expansion with the conservation of endangered and keystone species, like the felids. We combined camera trapping and remote sensing-generated data into occupancy modelling to study the habitat use and space partitioning by four sympatric felids across an agricultural landscape in Colombia. The area includes cattle ranching and oil palm cultivation, an emerging land use in the Neotropics. Strong determinants of species occupancy were wetlands for jaguars (positive effect); water proximity (positive effect) for pumas; and pasture (negative effect) for ocelots and jaguarundis. Felid species except ocelots were never recorded in oil palm areas. Our results suggest that to align development with the conservation of top predators it is key to maintain areas of forest and wetland across agricultural landscapes and targeting agricultural and oil palm expansion to already-modified areas like pastures, which showed limited conservation value in the region. Lastly, as there was no spatial segregation between the studied felid species, conservation strategies to simultaneously benefit this guild seem possible even in modified landscapes

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: camera trap; Object Oriented Image Analysis; occupancy; oil palm; Panthera onca; Puma concolor
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH541 Ecology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Human Ecology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Joseph Tzanopoulos
Date Deposited: 20 Mar 2018 16:25 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Nov 2018 12:23 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/66486 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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