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The King James bible: crown, church and people

Fincham, Kenneth (2020) The King James bible: crown, church and people. Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 71 (1). pp. 77-97. ISSN 0022-0469. (doi:10.1017/S0022046918001318)

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https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022046918001318

Abstract

This essay addresses several unresolved problems associated with the production, dissemination and reception of the King James bible. It argues that James I’s initial enthusiasm was not sustained and that Archbishop Bancroft was the key figure for seeing the translation to completion. His death, just before the bible appeared, explains why there was no order for its purchase by parishes. Instead, its acquisition was left to individual bishops so that it took until the civil war for the new bible to be widely available in worship. Its broad acceptability by that time was a result of its increasing use in household and private devotions as much as in public worship.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1017/S0022046918001318
Subjects: D History General and Old World > DA Great Britain
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: Kenneth Fincham
Date Deposited: 13 Mar 2018 10:56 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 11:16 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/66361 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Fincham, Kenneth: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8539-2124
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