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The long-term outcome of synchronous bilateral breast cancer is worse than metachronous or unilateral tumours

Carmichael, A.R., Bendall, S., Lockerbie, L., Prescott, R., Bates, Tom (2002) The long-term outcome of synchronous bilateral breast cancer is worse than metachronous or unilateral tumours. European Journal of Surgical Oncology, 28 (4). pp. 388-391. ISSN 0748-7983. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:66250)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

AIM

There is uncertainty in the literature as to whether bilateral breast cancer carries a worse prognosis than unilateral disease because some studies suggest that the development of a second primary does not influence survival, while others report a decreased survival in patients suffering from bilateral disease.

METHODS

A prospectively accrued and regularly validated database of 1945 patients with breast cancer treated in a district general hospital between 1963 and 1999 was analysed for clinical and pathological tumour characteristics including family history, grade, type of tumour, treatment and outcome.

RESULTS

Five per cent of patients (92) suffered from metachronous and 43 (2%) from synchronous bilateral breast cancer. A family history of breast cancer was more common in patients with metachronous bilateral breast cancer (38%), compared with the unilateral group (15%) and the synchronous bilateral breast cancer group (17%) (chi(2)=22.9, P<0.001). Patients with synchronous bilateral breast cancer had a significantly worse overall survival when compared with those with metachronous bilateral or unilateral breast cancer (log-rank test chi(2)=6.1, P=0.047).

CONCLUSION

Women with metachronous breast cancer were more likely to have positive family history, while those with synchronous bilateral breast cancer tend to have shorter survival when compared with those with unilateral breast cancer. Synchronous bilaterality is not, however, an independent risk factor on multivariate analysis.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Bates Tom
Date Deposited: 13 Mar 2018 13:39 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 20:19 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/66250 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Bates, Tom: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5554-1945
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