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Applying Distributed Embedded Electronic Instrumentation to the Measurement and Analysis of Multiple Acoustic and Ultrasonic Signals

Hopkins, Mark B. (2018) Applying Distributed Embedded Electronic Instrumentation to the Measurement and Analysis of Multiple Acoustic and Ultrasonic Signals. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) thesis, University of Kent,. (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

In many industrial applications there is a requirement to monitor acoustic and ultrasonic signals at selected locations across large structures - and leak detection in power station boilers would be a good example of such an application. Conventional topologies dictate that the analogue output signals from the acoustic and ultrasonic sensors are routed individually back to a central computer in the control room, where they are digitised and then analysed for the purposes demanded. Such topologies require long (and expensive) individual runs of specialist cables (sometimes lengths in the order of 500 meters), over which the sensor signals suffer significant degradation and exposure to interference. The central computer also requires high levels of processing bandwidth, if the sensors signals are to be processed concurrently.

This analysis of the sensor signals locally greatly improves digitised signal fidelity, markedly reduces noise, and provides a powerful dedicated processing resource for every sensor.

This work also includes the development of a very low noise charge preamplifier for piezo electric transducers, much improving the sensitivity of measurements with these sensors.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctor of Philosophy (PhD))
Thesis advisor: Lee, Peter
Thesis advisor: Waller, Winston
Uncontrolled keywords: Distributed Acoustic Signal Analysis Distributed Embedded Instrumentation Digital Signal Analysis Charge Amplifier Noise Reduction Logarithmic Conversion
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Engineering and Digital Arts
SWORD Depositor: System Moodle
Depositing User: System Moodle
Date Deposited: 05 Feb 2018 13:10 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 20:14 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/65908 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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