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What Is the Proportion of Studies Reporting Patient and Practitioner Satisfaction with Software Support Tools Used in the Management of Knee Pain and Is This Related to Sample Size, Effect Size, and Journal Impact Factor?

Bright, Philip, Hambly, Karen (2018) What Is the Proportion of Studies Reporting Patient and Practitioner Satisfaction with Software Support Tools Used in the Management of Knee Pain and Is This Related to Sample Size, Effect Size, and Journal Impact Factor? Telemedicine and e-Health, 24 (9). pp. 562-576. ISSN 1530-5627. E-ISSN 1556-3669. (doi:10.1089/tmj.2017.0207)

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Abstract

Introduction: E-health software tools have been deployed in managing knee conditions. Reporting of patient and practitioner satisfaction in studies regarding e-health usage is not widely explored. The objective of this review was to identify studies describing patient and practitioner satisfaction with software use concerning knee pain. Materials and Methods: A computerized search was undertaken: four electronic databases were searched from January 2007 until January 2017. Key words were decision dashboard, clinical decision, Web-based resource, evidence support, and knee. Full texts were scanned for effect of size reporting and satisfaction scales from participants and practitioners. Binary regression was run; impact factor and sample size were predictors with indicators for satisfaction and effect size reporting as dependent variables. Results: Seventy-seven articles were retrieved; 37 studies were included in final analysis. Ten studies reported patient satisfaction ratings (27.8%): a single study reported both patient and practitioner satisfaction (2.8%). Randomized control trials were the most common design (35%) and knee osteoarthritis the most prevalent condition (38%). Electronic patient-reported outcome measures and Web-based training were the most common interventions. No significant dependency was found within the regression models (p > 0.05). Discussion and Conclusions: The proportion of reporting of patient satisfaction was low; practitioner satisfaction was poorly represented. There may be implications for the suitability of administering e-health, a medium for capturing further meta-evidence needs to be established and used as best practice for implicated studies in future. This is the first review of its kind to address patient and practitioner satisfaction with knee e-health.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1089/tmj.2017.0207
Uncontrolled keywords: e-health, telemedicine, rehabilitation, technology, home health monitoring
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General) > R119.9 Telecommunication in medicine, Telemedicine
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Karen Hambly
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2018 10:26 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 20:12 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/65838 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Hambly, Karen: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3442-2493
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