The trajectory of human prenatal enamel growth slows through the trimesters

Mahoney, Patrick (2014) The trajectory of human prenatal enamel growth slows through the trimesters. In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology. . WILEY-LISS, DIV JOHN WILEY & SONS INC (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajpa.v1...

Abstract

Typically, human fetal growth rates change through the trimesters depending on the tissue type. Linear growth in long bones peaks in the second trimester and increases in fetal weight are greatest in the third. Human deciduous tooth enamel starts to develop at different times in utero, commencing with the central incisor and lastly with the second molar. But whether the trajectory of prenatal enamel growth remains the same for each tooth type is poorly understood. Here, I use histological methods to determine how long it takes a 250?m (in 25?m increments) thick layer of prenatal enamel to form in maxillary incisors, canines, and molars (n=88). I also calculate prenatal extension rates to assess how quickly these teeth grow in height. I relate the trajectory of growth in thickness and height to the trimesters. Findings are tested on mandibular lateral incisors and second molars (n=33). Results show that the growth trajectory changes through the trimesters. Incisor enamel initiated early in the second trimester and 250?m formed over 52-57 days. Canines and second molars initiated closer to birth and required 60- 64 days to form the same depth of enamel. Although initial extension rates were positively correlated with crown height within each tooth class (incisors, r=0.714; molars, r=0.676), they were significantly greater (p<0.005) in incisors when compared to the taller canines and second molars. These findings provide evidence that initial prenatal enamel growth is faster in incisors than all other deciduous tooth types. I infer this is related to their early postnatal eruption.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Poster)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Biological Anthropology
Depositing User: Patrick Mahoney
Date Deposited: 22 Nov 2017 15:22 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 19:52 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/64628 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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