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Mining a productive seam? The coal industry, community and sociology

Strangleman, Tim (2017) Mining a productive seam? The coal industry, community and sociology. Contemporary British History, 32 (1). pp. 18-38. ISSN 1361-9462. E-ISSN 1743-7997. (doi:10.1080/13619462.2017.1408532)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13619462.2017.1408532

Abstract

Recently there have been calls for sociology in Britain to reflect on its longstanding historical attention and focus, something which has been neglected of late. At the same time there is growing interest in the historiography of British sociology and critical reflection on how its early post-war assumptions went on to structure later research, writing and scholarship. Developing both of these insights this article looks at British sociology’s longstanding relationship with the coal industry, its work and especially its communities. From Coal is our Life (1956) through to Coal was our Life (2000) the sector has been an important site of sociological attention. It was an early focus of post-war community studies, becoming home to a residual traditional working class. Later still it was an arena of conflict on the front line of Thatcher’s Britain, before becoming a site on which to study loss and deindustrialisation. This article asks what sociology learnt from the deep coal mining industry and what it might still explore in the future around questions of regeneration and the ‘half-life’ of deindustrialisation.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/13619462.2017.1408532
Subjects: H Social Sciences
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Tim Strangleman
Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2017 12:04 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Jun 2019 23:00 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/64578 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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