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The role and influence of micro-cultures in long-term care on the mental health and wellbeing of older people: a scoping review of evidence

Mikelyte, Rasa, Milne, Alisoun (2016) The role and influence of micro-cultures in long-term care on the mental health and wellbeing of older people: a scoping review of evidence. Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 17 (3). pp. 198-214. ISSN 1471-7794. E-ISSN 2042-8766. (doi:10.1108/QAOA-09-2015-0044) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:63418)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/QAOA-09-2015-0044

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore evidence about the role played by micro-cultures in longterm care (LTC) settings in shaping residents’ mental health and wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach: A scoping review on micro-cultures in LTC, including database search of academic and grey literature using pre-determined combinations of key terms and specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. The review followed the methodological framework of Arksey and O’Malley (2005).

Findings: Micro-cultures (localised, distinctive cultures of a small group of people) in LTC are complex, multi-faceted and multi-directional; they include social dynamics as well as structural and environmental factors. Although much work has been done on the nature of micro-cultures, limited work has focused on LTC for older people. Initiatives to promote the mental health and wellbeing of residents rarely consider microcultures in any holistic way; they tend to be taken into account either as part of a contextual backdrop, or as a uni-directional process often equated with the concept of “care culture” or “organisational culture”.

Originality/value: The role played by micro-cultures in influencing the mental health and wellbeing of older people living in LTC settings is significantly under researched. The findings of this review suggest that their complexity and multidimensionality challenges researchers. However if the authors are to develop interventions that promote the mental health and wellbeing of residents it is important to invest in work to explore their nature and systemic influence.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1108/QAOA-09-2015-0044
Uncontrolled keywords: Mental health, Elderly, Wellbeing, Older people, Long term care, Micro-cultures
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Rasa Mikelyte
Date Deposited: 15 Sep 2017 08:36 UTC
Last Modified: 21 Jan 2020 16:24 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/63418 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Mikelyte, Rasa: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2772-8240
Milne, Alisoun: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0977-8156
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