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Populism as identity politics: Perceived ingroup disadvantage, collective narcissism and support for populism

Marchlewska, Marta, Cichocka, Aleksandra, Panayiotou, Orestis, Castellanos, Kevin, Batayneh, Jude (2017) Populism as identity politics: Perceived ingroup disadvantage, collective narcissism and support for populism. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 9 (2). pp. 151-162. ISSN 1948-5506. E-ISSN 1948-5514. (doi:10.1177/1948550617732393)

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Abstract

Populists combine anti-elitism with a conviction that they hold a superior vision of what it means to be a true citizen of their nation. We expected support for populism to be associated with national collective narcissism—an unrealistic belief in the greatness of the national group, which should increase in response to perceived ingroup disadvantage. In Study 1 (Polish participants; n=1007), national collective narcissism predicted support for the populist Law and Justice party. In the experimental Study 2 (British participants; n=497), perceived long-term ingroup disadvantage led to greater support for Brexit and this relationship was accounted for by national collective narcissism. In Study 3 (American participants; n=403), group relative deprivation predicted support for Donald Trump and this relationship was accounted for by national collective narcissism. These associations were present even when we controlled for conventional national identification. We discuss implications of the link between collective narcissism and support for populism.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1177/1948550617732393
Uncontrolled keywords: populism, collective narcissism, ingroup disadvantage, relative deprivation
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Aleksandra Cichocka
Date Deposited: 13 Sep 2017 22:03 UTC
Last Modified: 19 Jul 2019 13:34 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/63401 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Cichocka, Aleksandra: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1703-1586
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