Is Our Culture of Empathy Perpetuating Inequality?

Pedwell, Carolyn (2017) Is Our Culture of Empathy Perpetuating Inequality? . Zocalo Public Square, 1 pp. Online article. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/2017/07/17/cultu...

Abstract

We desperately need more empathy. At least, that’s what we are told—in political rhetoric, in bestselling popular science books, in international development discourse, in feminist and anti-racist activism. Among current political antagonisms, especially the rise of Trumpism, many are worried about the deleterious effects of “empathy erosion.” Empathy has been touted as a necessary quality in leadership, the solution to a wide range of social ills and a central component of social justice. If we see from another’s perspective, imaginatively experiencing her or his thoughts, feelings or predicaments, we will open up lines of dialogue, ameliorate conflicts and grievances, and engage in more ethical or socially responsible action. The problem, however, is that empathy is much more uneven and unpredictable than these narratives convey.

Item Type: Internet publication
Uncontrolled keywords: Empathy, power, inequality, social justice
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Sociology
Depositing User: Carolyn Pedwell
Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2017 11:18 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Sep 2017 08:42 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/63235 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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