Immigration and the Crime Drop: International Perspectives

Ignatans, Dainis, Matthews, Roger A. (2017) Immigration and the Crime Drop: International Perspectives. European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, 25 (3). pp. 205-229. ISSN 0928-9569. E-ISSN 1571-8174. (doi:10.1163/15718174-02503002) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

PDF - Author's Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 19 July 2019.
Contact us about this Publication Download (318kB)
[img]
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1163/15718174-02503002

Abstract

Explanations of the remarkable decrease in crime over the last two decades across a number of western countries have been in varying degrees unpersuasive. The article presents an exploratory analysis of possible links between immigration into the UK and crime levels. Drawing on a range of international research the paper suggests that in contrast to the popular opinion that increased immigration is associated with an increase in crime, that not only are the recent waves of immigration not statistically linked to increased rates of crime in the UK and elsewhere, but that the proposition that recent waves of immigration may have contributed to the crime drop is tenable. Possible ways of clarifying the issue are suggested.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1163/15718174-02503002
Uncontrolled keywords: Immigration, crime, crime drop, violence, victimisation
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
J Political Science > JV Colonies and colonization. Emigration and immigration. International migration
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Roger Matthews
Date Deposited: 23 Aug 2017 10:15 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 19:23 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/62927 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year