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Differential control of respiratory frequency and tidal volume during high-intensity interval training

Nicolò, Andrea, Marcora, Samuele Maria, Bazzucchi, Ilenia, Sacchetti, Massimo (2017) Differential control of respiratory frequency and tidal volume during high-intensity interval training. Experimental Physiology, 102 (8). pp. 934-949. ISSN 0958-0670. E-ISSN 1469-445X. (doi:10.1113/EP086352)

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Abstract

New Findings: What is the central question of this study?

Respiratory frequency, but not tidal volume, responded rapidly and in proportion to changes in workload during HIIT, and was dissociated from some markers of metabolic stimuli in response to both experimental manipulations, suggesting that fast inputs contribute more than metabolic stimuli to fR regulation. Differentiating between fR and tidal volume may help to unravel the mechanisms underlying exercise hyperpnoea.

Given that respiratory frequency (fR) has been proposed as a good marker of physical effort, furthering the understanding of how fR is regulated during exercise is of great importance. We manipulated recovery intensity and exercise duration during high-intensity interval training (HIIT) to test the hypothesis that fast inputs (including central command) contribute more than metabolic stimuli to fR regulation. Seven male cyclists performed an incremental test, a 10 and a 20 min continuous time trial (TT) as preliminary tests. Subsequently, recovery intensity and exercise duration were manipulated during HIIT (30 s work and 30 s active recovery) by performing four 10 min and one 20 min trial (recovery intensities of 85, 70, 55 and 30% of the 10 min TT mean workload; and 85% of the 20 min TT mean workload). The work intensity of the HIIT sessions was self-paced by participants to achieve the best performance possible. When manipulating recovery intensity, fR, but not tidal volume (VT), showed a fast response to the alternation of the work and recovery phases, proportional to the extent of workload variations. No association between fR and gas exchange responses was observed. When manipulating exercise duration, fR and rating of perceived exertion were dissociated from VT, carbon dioxide output and oxygen uptake responses. Overall, the rating of perceived exertion was strongly correlated with fR (r = 0.87; P < 0.001) but not with VT. These findings may reveal a differential control of fR and VT during HIIT, with fast inputs appearing to contribute more than metabolic stimuli to fR regulation. Differentiating between fR and VT may help to unravel the mechanisms underlying exercise hyperpnoea.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1113/EP086352
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems)
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Samuele Marcora
Date Deposited: 09 Aug 2017 10:28 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 19:17 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/62585 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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