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Exploring the effects of radical change to assessment and feedback processes: Applying TBL in a social science module

Cohen, J., Robinson, Catherine (2017) Exploring the effects of radical change to assessment and feedback processes: Applying TBL in a social science module. In: Assessment in HE 6th International Conference, 28 - 29 June 2017, Manchester UK. (Unpublished) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

This paper is an evaluation of our efforts to introduce an engaging and collaborative learning environment by implementing team-based learning in a module to address core concerns about student underperformance. It is accepted that assessment frames student learning (Gibbs & Simpson, 2004), while Boud states that ‘every act of assessment gives a message to students about what they should be learning and how they should go about it' (1995 p.2). We wanted to devise an assessment and feedback regime to deliver that message to students and provide them with the tools for deep learning. Team-based learning has been an accepted method of addressing concerns about both student performance and attendance in the US since the 1980s (Sibley & Ostafichuk 2014). Team-based learning is far more than group work; it is an intricate system involving flipped learning, individual knowledge quizzes, team-based application exercises, discussion and peer feedback. We felt that this approach incorporated many of the conditions cited by Gibbs and Simpson as supporting student learning (2004). At the same time, we anticipated that the multiple and varied opportunities for feedback provided an ongoing feedback dialogue key to student learning (Boud 2000, Carless et al 2011). Implementing team-based learning in a traditionally taught module in traditionally designed teaching spaces was challenging. Students were provided with learning materials online ahead of the large lecture session. Lectures were used for the readiness assurance process of team-based learning (an assessment and feedback element), including mini lectures for clarification. Seminar (small group) sessions allowed teams to explore application exercises (a formative assessment/feedback element). In this way, students covered the core elements of team-based learning and received feedback from peers and academics covering individual and team performance. Student evaluations of team-based learning are mixed, and our initial conclusion suggests improved performance contingent on student motivation. Overall metrics will be compared using a mixed methods approach. Qualitative data have been collected using feedback surveys, questionnaires and focus groups. Quantitative data on the student cohort are available from student performance and attendance records and will be interrogated using multiple regression analysis, an approach common to many educational studies in relation to attainment and student characteristics (c.f. Koljatic & Kuh, 2001). The paper provides a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of team-based learning implementation and will give participants an opportunity to discuss the benefits and challenges of using team-based learning in their own practice.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School
Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Accounting and Finance
Depositing User: Judy Cohen
Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2017 09:50 UTC
Last Modified: 17 Jun 2019 13:02 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/62535 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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