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New insights into the systematics of Malagasy mongoose-like carnivorans (Carnivora, Eupleridae, Galidiinae) based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences

Veron, Géraldine, Dupré, Délia, Jennings, Andrew P., Gardner, Charlie J., Hassanin, Alexandre, Goodman, Steven M. (2017) New insights into the systematics of Malagasy mongoose-like carnivorans (Carnivora, Eupleridae, Galidiinae) based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, 55 (3). pp. 250-264. ISSN 0947-5745. E-ISSN 1439-0469. (doi:10.1111/jzs.12168) (KAR id:62103)

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Abstract

The Malagasy carnivorans (Eupleridae) comprise seven genera and up to ten species, depending on the authority, and, within the past decades, two new taxa have been described. The family is divided into two subfamilies, the Galidiinae, mongoose-like animals, and the Euplerinae, with diverse body forms. To verify the taxonomic status of Galidiinae species, including recently described taxa, as well as some recognized subspecies, we studied intrageneric genetic variation and structure, using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. Our results suggest the recognition of four species in the Galidiinae, rendering each genus monospecific. We propose to recognize three subspecies in Galidia elegans (G. e. dambrensis, G. e. elegans, and G. e. occidentalis), two subspecies in Mungotictis decemlineata (M. d. decemlineata and M. d. lineata), and two subspecies in Galidictis fasciata (G. f. fasciata and G. f. grandidieri, the latter was recently described as a distinct species). Our results indicate also that Salanoia durrelli should be treated as a junior synonym of Salanoia concolor. Low levels of intraspecific divergence revealed some geographical structure for the Galidiinae taxa, suggesting that environmental barriers have isolated certain populations in recent geological time. All taxa, whether at the species or subspecies level, need urgent conservation attention, particularly those with limited geographical distributions, as all are threatened by forest habitat degradation.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/jzs.12168
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Depositing User: Charlie Gardner
Date Deposited: 19 Jun 2017 14:35 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 19:09 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/62103 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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