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Counter-Stereotypes and Feminism Promote Leadership Aspirations in Highly Identified Women

Leicht, Carola, Goclowska, Malgorzata A., Van Breen, Jolien A., de Lemus, Soledad, Randsley de Moura, Georgina (2017) Counter-Stereotypes and Feminism Promote Leadership Aspirations in Highly Identified Women. Frontiers in Psychology, 8 . Article Number 883. ISSN 1664-1078. (doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00883) (KAR id:61977)

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https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00883

Abstract

Although women who highly identify with other women are more susceptible to stereotype threat effects, women's identification might associate with greater leadership aspirations contingent on (1) counter-stereotype salience and (2) feminist identification. When gender counter-stereotypes are salient, women's identification should associate with greater leadership aspiration regardless of feminism, while when gender stereotypes are salient, women's identification would predict greater leadership aspirations contingent on a high level of feminist identification. In our study US-based women (N = 208) attended to gender stereotypic (vs. counter-stereotypic) content. We measured identification with women and identification with feminism, and, following the manipulation, leadership aspirations in an imagined work scenario. The interaction between identification with women, identification with feminism, and attention to stereotypes (vs. counter-stereotypes) significantly predicted leadership aspirations. In the counter-stereotypic condition women's identification associated with greater leadership aspirations regardless of feminist identification. In the stereotypic condition women's identification predicted leadership aspirations only at high levels of feminist identification. We conclude that salient counter-stereotypes and a strong identification with feminism may help high women identifiers increase their leadership aspirations.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00883
Uncontrolled keywords: women, gender identity, gender stereotypes, feminism, leadership
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Centre for the Studies of Group Processes
Divisions > Kent Business School > Kent Business School
Depositing User: Georgina Randsley de Moura
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2017 14:06 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 13:46 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/61977 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Leicht, Carola: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4117-1215
Randsley de Moura, Georgina: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6285-6128
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