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How should I regulate my emotions if I want to run faster?

Lane, Andrew M., Devonport, Tracey J., Friesen, Andrew P., Beedie, Christopher J., Fullerton, Chris, Stanley, Damian M. (2015) How should I regulate my emotions if I want to run faster? European Journal of Sport Science, 16 (4). pp. 465-472. ISSN 1746-1391. E-ISSN 1536-7290. (doi:10.1080/17461391.2015.1080305) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:61864)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2015.1080305

Abstract

The present study investigated the effects of emotion regulation strategies on self-reported emotions and 1600?m track running performance. In stage 1 of a three-stage study, participants (N?=?15) reported emotional states associated with best, worst and ideal performance. Results indicated that a best and ideal emotional state for performance composed of feeling happy, calm, energetic and moderately anxious whereas the worst emotional state for performance composed of feeling downhearted, sluggish and highly anxious. In stage 2, emotion regulation interventions were developed using online material and supported by electronic feedback. One intervention motivated participants to increase the intensity of unpleasant emotions (e.g. feel more angry and anxious). A second intervention motivated participants to reduce the intensity of unpleasant emotions (e.g. feel less angry and anxious). In stage 3, using a repeated measures design, participants used each intervention before running a 1600?m time trial. Data were compared with a no treatment control condition. The intervention designed to increase the intensity of unpleasant emotions resulted in higher anxiety and lower calmness scores but no significant effects on 1600?m running time. The intervention designed to reduce the intensity of unpleasant emotions was associated with significantly slower times for the first 400?m. We suggest future research should investigate emotion regulation, emotion and performance using quasi-experimental methods with performance measures that are meaningful to participants.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/17461391.2015.1080305
Uncontrolled keywords: Emotion regulation, emotion, meta-emotional beliefs, psychological skills, endurance performance
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Christopher Fullerton
Date Deposited: 26 May 2017 14:11 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 13:45 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/61864 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Fullerton, Chris: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2933-1578
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