Skip to main content

‘I was no “master of this work” but a servant to it’? William Laud, Charles I and the making of Scottish ecclesiastical policy, 1634-6

James, Leonie (2017) ‘I was no “master of this work” but a servant to it’? William Laud, Charles I and the making of Scottish ecclesiastical policy, 1634-6. Historical Research, 90 (249). pp. 506-525. ISSN 0950-3471. E-ISSN 1468-2281. (doi:10.1111/1468-2281.12184) (KAR id:61754)

Abstract

Building upon recent scholarship, this article presents a study of policy formation within the composite monarchy of Charles I. Through a scrutiny of the 1636 canons – a crucial but neglected aspect of the ‘Laudian’ programme in Scotland – new light is shed on the contested dynamics of the working partnership between the king and William Laud, archbishop of Canterbury (1633–45). The article also engages with the question of whether Laud can accurately be described as ‘the master’ of religious reform in Scotland and contends that he recast retrospectively his role in policy formation – not just in the canons, but in other, equally controversial, aspects of Scottish policy – thus concealing the true extent of his involvement, by presenting himself as having been a servant, not an agent. Suggesting greater involvement in Scottish affairs than has hitherto been acknowledged, these findings put Laud at the heart of a programme of religious reform that extended across the British churches during the sixteen-thirties.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/1468-2281.12184
Subjects: D History General and Old World > DA Great Britain
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: Leonie James
Date Deposited: 17 May 2017 09:33 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 15:48 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/61754 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
James, Leonie: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6869-6575
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year