Ecotourism marketing alternative to charismatic megafauna can also support biodiversity conservation

Hausmann, Anna and Slotow, Rob and Fraser, Iain M and Di Minin, Enrico (2016) Ecotourism marketing alternative to charismatic megafauna can also support biodiversity conservation. Animal Conservation, 20 (1). pp. 91-100. ISSN 1367-9430. E-ISSN 1469-1795. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/acv.12292) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acv.12292

Abstract

Charismatic species are the main attractor of ecotourists to protected areas, but this narrow interest leads to under-appreciation of other biodiversity as well as cultural values of protected areas. Many protected areas with high conservation value, but little funding, lack charismatic species. Exploring tourists’ preferences alternative to charismatic species may help identify ecotourism markets that are more likely to support such areas. We used a choice experiment and latent class model to explore tourists’ heterogeneous preference for biodiversity and biodiversity-related activities in South African national parks. We found that tourists’ preferences were not restricted to charismatic species, but extended to less charismatic biodiversity, as well as to landscapes. In addition, biodiversity-related activities, such as camping and game drives, the sense of wilderness attached to the place tourists were visiting and accessibility of protected areas, also affected tourists’ preferences. Particularly, domestic tourists, as well as more experienced international tourists, were more likely to support initiatives that promote a broader biodiversity experience than charismatic species alone, and were prepared to travel longer distances to do so. Our results reveal new opportunities to promote and support biodiversity conservation at sites where only less charismatic biodiversity is present. In addition, our results may help inform land-use planning based on public preferences for biodiversity conservation, incorporating sense of place.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: choice experiment; latent class segmentation; cultural service; sense of place; conservation marketing; ecotourism; wilderness experience
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Economics
Depositing User: Iain Fraser
Date Deposited: 27 Apr 2017 10:03 UTC
Last Modified: 25 Jul 2018 12:56 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/61569 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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