Has computational creativity successfully made it 'Beyond the Fence' in musical theatre?

Jordanous, Anna (2017) Has computational creativity successfully made it 'Beyond the Fence' in musical theatre? Connection Science, 29 (4). pp. 350-386. ISSN 0954-0091. E-ISSN 1360-0494. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/09540091.2017.1345857) (Full text available)

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https://doi.org/10.1080/09540091.2017.1345857

Abstract

A significant test for software is when it is tasked with replicating human performance, as was the case recently with creative software and the commercial project Beyond the Fence (undertaken for a television documentary Computer Says Show). The remit of the Beyond the Fence project was to use computer software as much as possible to produce a musical show billed as `the world's first computer-generated musical’. Several computational creativity systems were used in the production of this musical, which was performed in London's West End for a two week run in 2016. This paper considers the challenge of evaluating this project. Current computational creativity evaluation methods are ill-suited to evaluating projects involving creative input from multiple systems and people. Following recent inspiration within computational creativity research from interaction design, here the DECIDE evaluation framework is used to evaluate the Beyond the Fence project along two questions: (1) To what extent is the project successful? and (2) To what extent does this project demonstrate computational creativity? Evaluation lets us conclude that this was a reasonably successful achievement of the task of using computational generation in producing a credible musical show. Lessons have been learned for future computational creativity projects though, particularly for affording creative software more agency and enabling software to interact with other creative partners. Upon reflection, the DECIDE framework emerges as a useful evaluation `checklist' (if not a tangible operational methodology) for the evaluation of multiple creative systems participating in a single creative task.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: computational creativity, musical theatre, beyond the fence, creativity evaluation, human-computer interactive creativity
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General) > Q335 Artificial intelligence
Q Science > QA Mathematics (inc Computing science) > QA 76 Software, computer programming,
Q Science > QA Mathematics (inc Computing science) > QA 76 Software, computer programming, > QA76.575 Multimedia systems
Q Science > QA Mathematics (inc Computing science) > QA 76 Software, computer programming, > QA76.76 Computer software
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Computing
Faculties > Sciences > School of Computing > Computational Intelligence Group
Faculties > Sciences > School of Computing > Data Science
Depositing User: Anna Jordanous
Date Deposited: 19 Apr 2017 16:05 UTC
Last Modified: 02 Nov 2018 00:00 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/61395 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Jordanous, Anna: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2076-8642
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