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Tolerance of exercise-induced pain at a fixed rating of perceived exertion predicts time trial cycling performance

Astokorki, A H Y, Mauger, A R (2016) Tolerance of exercise-induced pain at a fixed rating of perceived exertion predicts time trial cycling performance. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 27 (3). pp. 309-317. ISSN 1600-0838. (doi:10.1111/sms.12659) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:61035)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.12659

Abstract

To compare the predictive capacity of experimental pain and exercised-induced pain (EIP) on exercise performance. Thirty-two recreationally active male (n = 23) and female (n = 9) participants were recruited. Participants completed measures of pain tolerance by cold pressor test (CPT), pain pressure threshold via algometry (PPT), and EIP tolerance using an RPE clamp trial. A VO2max test provided traditional predictors of performance [VO2max , gas-exchange threshold? (GET), peak power output (PPO)]. Finally, participants completed a 16.1-km cycling time trial (TT). No correlation was found between experimental pain measures (CPT, PPT) and TT performance. However, there was a significant correlation between EIP tolerance and TT performance (R = -0.83, P < 0.01). Regression analysis for pain and physiological predictor variables (mean pain in CPT, PPT, EIP tolerance, VO2max , PPO, GET) revealed that a significant model (P < 0.01) emerged when only PPO (Adjusted R(2)  = 0.739) and EIP tolerance (?R(2)  = 0.075) were used to predict TT performance. These findings suggest that EIP tolerance is an important factor in endurance performance. However, PPT and CPT have limited ability to assess this relationship, and so their use in EIP research should be treated with caution.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/sms.12659
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Lex Mauger
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2017 15:03 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 13:44 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/61035 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Mauger, A R: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6685-5800
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