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Sacrifice and distinction in dirty work: men’s construction of meaning in the butcher trade

Simpson, R.a, Hughes, J.b, Slutskaya, N.a, Balta, M. (2014) Sacrifice and distinction in dirty work: men’s construction of meaning in the butcher trade. Work Employment & Society, 28 (5). pp. 754-770. ISSN 0950-0170. E-ISSN 1469-8722. (doi:10.1177/0950017013510759) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0950017013510759

Abstract

Through a study of the butcher trade, this article explores the meanings that men give to ‘dirty work’, that is jobs or roles that are seen as distasteful or ‘undesirable’. Based on qualitative data, we identify three themes from butchers’ accounts that relate to work-based meanings: sacrifice through physicality of work; loss and nostalgia in the face of industrial change; and distinction from membership of a shared trade. Drawing on Bourdieu, we argue that sacrifice and distinction help us understand some of the meanings men attach to dirty, manual work – forming part of a working-class ‘habitus’. Further, these assessments can be both ‘reproductive’ and ‘productive’ as butchers reinforce historically grounded evaluations of work and mobilize new meanings in response to changes in the trade. © The Author(s) 2014.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1177/0950017013510759
Additional information: cited By 5
Uncontrolled keywords: class; dirty work; masculinity; work meanings
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Industrial Relations/HRM
Depositing User: Maria Balta
Date Deposited: 15 Mar 2017 10:46 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 18:50 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/60916 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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